Mom’s Pastries | bloginfo(‘name’); ?>

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May 5, 2022 0 comments

By Keith Schell

When we were very young, our mother was generally a stay-at-home mom, except in the late spring and early summer when she worked preparing cabins for a local lodge and preparing them for guests of summer.

When the lodge cabins were properly cleaned and prepared, Mom would come home and the student staff would come and take over the work for the rest of the summer.

And because she usually had time back then to be a stay-at-home mom, mom liked to cook.

And she was really good at it!

Like Pavlov’s dogs when the bell rang, the mere mention that Mom was going to bake the next day was usually enough to make the whole family salivate. Or, at the very least, look forward to getting home that day to see what was on the menu.

Chelsea buns, sugar cookies, cinnamon buns, double layer chocolate cakes, fresh bread. A plethora of delicious pastries made from scratch. And the heavenly smells of all the baked goods our mother made.

Walking into our house a few days after school could be a delightful olfactory experience.

And my classmates knew that my mother was a good baker. When we had a school bake sale, my mom’s stuff was usually one of the first things to go!

I remember on Valentine’s Day in seventh grade, our mom made enough sugar cookies for me to bring a box to school to give one to each of the kids and the teacher in my class. They were each topped with white icing and four cinnamon valentine hearts. Delicious! When I handed them out to my classmates, I was the most popular kid in my class that day.

My mother was a very generous person and liked to donate her baked goods to worthwhile causes on occasion when needed.

We usually knew when Mom was going to do some charity baking and always looked forward to coming home to a counter full of goodies the next day.

When we came home from school that day, we walked into our house and the kitchen was warm and fragrant with the smell of fresh baked goods. The counters were filled with cakes, cookies, pies and all sorts of other delicious treats.

After saying “hi” to mom, we would usually go to the kitchen counters and happily examine her freshly prepared bounty.

Seeing and smelling all those heavenly fresh baked goods around the house usually made us want to do a little sampling.

When we tried to help ourselves to a biscuit, we received a light pat on the wrists from our mother and a stern reprimand from her: “Don’t touch those! They’re for the Church bake sale! Oh.

Can we have a piece of that chocolate cake still warm from the oven? “You can’t have any of this!” It’s for your cousin’s baby shower on the weekend! Oh.

So how about a little piece of those tasty Chelsea rolls? “You can’t have them either!” I promised them to your aunt for her Ladies Club meeting on Friday night! Hmm.

OK, so if we can’t have all that, what can we have?

“Go to the fruit bowl and get an apple!”

?? You’re kidding, aren’t you??

Whenever this happened, we sometimes had the distinct feeling that the only way we would ever have the opportunity to eat one of our mother’s delicious baked goods was if we were a charity case ourselves!

Of course, that being said, we weren’t bullied. We’ve always had our fair share of mom’s wonderful baked goods as a family and usually more. I smile at the memory now.

As our mother has grown, she rarely cooks anymore. The only time she could do anything is if everyone came home at the same time for a visit and especially if the grandchildren came for a ride. Then she could whip up one of her delicious Chelsea Bun Cassers or some of her melt-in-your-mouth chocolate chip cookies!

And while no one in my family ever needed an excuse to come home to see our mom, knowing that mom could cook up something special when you got home was definitely an added incentive to go to her. to visit !

All my wishes,

Keith

(PS: I love you, Mom. Happy Mother’s Day!)

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